take the wind out of one's sails

take the wind out of one's sails
Digest 16/2002
to ruin or destroy someone's high expectations

I was hoping to be accepted by that university. When the rejection letter arrived, it really took the wind out of my sails.

The expression probably originates from the sport of racing sailboats. When one sailboat cuts in front of another, it literally takes the wind out of the rear boat's sails, causing it to lose its speed. The expression can be used to describe one's own disappointment.

Idioms and examples. 2014.

Игры ⚽ Поможем решить контрольную работу

Look at other dictionaries:

  • take the wind out of one's sails — idi take the wind out of one s sails, to destroy one s self assurance; disconcert or deflate one …   From formal English to slang

  • To take the wind out of one's sails — Wind Wind (w[i^]nd, in poetry and singing often w[imac]nd; 277), n. [AS. wind; akin to OS., OFries., D., & G. wind, OHG. wint, Dan. & Sw. vind, Icel. vindr, Goth winds, W. gwynt, L. ventus, Skr. v[=a]ta (cf. Gr. ah ths a blast, gale, ah^nai to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • take the wind out of one's sails — {v. phr.} To surprise someone by doing better or by catching him in an error. * /John came home boasting about the fish he had caught; it took the wind out of his sails when he found his little sister had caught a bigger one./ * /Dick took the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take the wind out of one's sails — {v. phr.} To surprise someone by doing better or by catching him in an error. * /John came home boasting about the fish he had caught; it took the wind out of his sails when he found his little sister had caught a bigger one./ * /Dick took the… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take\ the\ wind\ out\ of\ one's\ sails — v. phr. To surprise someone by doing better or by catching him in an error. John came home boasting about the fish he had caught; it took the wind out of his sails when he found his little sister had caught a bigger one. Dick took the wind out of …   Словарь американских идиом

  • take the wind out of one's sails — phrasal 1. : to sail to windward of a sailing vessel and so cut off the wind 2. : to frustrate by anticipating (as in argument) or by forestalling (as in action or movement) …   Useful english dictionary

  • take the starch out of — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To make (someone) feel weak or tired. * /The hot weather took the starch out of Mrs. Jones, and she didn t feel like doing a thing./ * /The cross country run took all the starch out of the boys./ 2. See: TAKE THE WIND OUT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take the starch out of — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To make (someone) feel weak or tired. * /The hot weather took the starch out of Mrs. Jones, and she didn t feel like doing a thing./ * /The cross country run took all the starch out of the boys./ 2. See: TAKE THE WIND OUT …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • take\ the\ starch\ out\ of — v. phr. informal 1. To make (someone) feel weak or tired. The hot weather took the starch out of Mrs. Jones, and she didn t feel like doing a thing. The cross country run took all the starch out of the boys. 2. See: take the wind out of one s… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • out of one's sails — See: TAKE THE WIND OUT OF ONE S SAILS …   Dictionary of American idioms

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